Health, Uncategorized

Men’s Health and Movember 2017

Men’s health is in crisis and this is a conversation worth having. The Movember Foundation sets out to get mates, fathers, partners and brothers talking about it. It remains the only charity dedicated to men’s health on a global scale and raises money for research into men’s health projects. Men are dying too young and this silence has to stop. This is also why, for the sixth year, I am growing a moustache. If a month’s worth of public humiliation means getting men to talk then it will have been worth it.

Prostate cancer

The second most common cancer in men worldwide, I had no idea and I doubt many do. Early detection is vital; there is a 98% survival rate beyond five years when caught early compared to a lowly 26% if late. The risk develops with age and peaks around 45 to 50 when men really need to take a PSA test, which measures the level of prostate specific antigen in the blood. Get it done. Had any strange urinary or ejaculation symptoms? Get it checked.

Testicular cancer

Only a few weeks ago I had, what I guess was, a cancer scare which was diagnosed as an epidermal cyst and benign. Of course this meant a check-up with a doctor and a trip to the hospital for a scan yet it’s better to be safe than sorry. 47% of the men diagnosed with testicular cancer in the UK each year are aged under 35. I’m now 34 and cannot think of this ever being discussed with my mates. Yeh, it likely seems weird to ask, ‘Have you checked your nuts?’ but getting that conversation out into the open is vital.

Mental Health

75% of all suicides are men. Also, one in eight men in the UK have experienced a mental health problem and I annually suffer from Seasonal Affective Disorder which is a type of depression that mainly hits in the winter months. This results in a low mood, irritability, feelings of worthlessness and lethargy. I only let a few people close to me know and I realise I should make others aware. Vitamin D supplements help but we really should talk, ask, listen, encourage action and check in. Men really should open up to vulnerability and not feel uncomfortable about asking mates for help, but we do.

This is only Day 12 of Movember and I’ve got a long way to go yet. Men’s health also has a long way to go to improve yet initiatives like this can only hope. If you want to see my progress take a look at my Instagram (@wiz52gram), Twitter (@wiz52) and please sponsor me at https://mobro.co/omarsoliman?mc=1

Advertisements
Standard
Health, Lifestyle, Mens Health, Opinion

Movember. The Importance of asking ‘how are you’?

This will be the fifth occasion I have participated in Movember and it gets more important every year. Some might say the growing of a moustache is some gimmicky, hipster tradition to show the world ‘Hey, I’ll grow some ridiculous facial hair and get away with it for charity’. If you do think that, you are grossly missing the point.

I truly grasped the importance of Movember in the country where the movement originates, Australia. Over there hipsters seemingly lurk on every corner and moustaches are far more readily spotted. There does not seem to be a taboo over comical upper facial hair, but there does seem to be a taboo over men’s health.

Whenever I think of an Australian, I think of the men I met while doing my farmwork. Tough men who would work in the field all day and come in to a steak dinner. One of the phrases I often heard (though barely aimed at me) was ‘Take a spoonful of concrete and harden the fuck up’. Down under, readily talking about men’s health was frowned upon. Men would not discuss how they were feeling, they’d get their head down and carry on. This is largely the case in the UK where suffering alone is a tangible concern.

Few people ask that simple question, ‘how are you?’ My boss asks me that every so often as she knows there are times when I am struggling, whether that be with my workload or battling Seasonal Affective Disorder. She will take me a quiet area and we will have a ten minute chat where I can offload. It makes a huge difference to know that there is someone checking in on you. When was the last time you asked someone ‘how are you?’ and got a truthful response? ‘I’m alright ta’, when really you have just seen them walk in looking as if they have the world on their shoulders.

Getting men to talk emotionally is a huge challenge and admittedly there are few men I speak to whom I know I can truly offload to. Ask yourself, if you were having a hard time mentally, who would you admit that to? The statistics make for distressing reading –

. One in eight men have experienced a mental health problem

. The biggest killer of men under 45 in the UK is suicide

Men cannot afford to keep it all in and to borrow one of the foundations slogans, ‘Suicide notes talk too late’. Aside from mental health, there are two physical illnesses which Stand Up To Cancer thankfully highlighted last week; prostate and testicular cancer.

. One in eight men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer at some point

. Testicular cancer is the most common form of cancer in men aged 25-49

And yet, do men talk about this? Not really, which is why the Movember Foundation is so vital. Simply talking about men’s health is one huge step and if that means me growing a moustache to raise awareness then great. Happy to.

 

Standard